DV Archive

Decision Virginia Archive 8/08- 7/12

Posts Tagged ‘Rick Santorum

Obama goes after Romney in TV ad airing in Virginia

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We aren’t quite to the general election yet, but don’t tell that to the re-election campaign of President Barack Obama.

 

 

For the first time in the 2012 election, the Obama campaign specifically mentioned a potential opponent in a television ad. The ad, which is in response to another ad attacking the president by a third-party group, defends the president’s record on energy. They point out that domestic energy production has gone up under the president’s leadership and the ad accuses Mitt Romney of defending “big oil”.

The Romney campaign said in a statement that the president is just hoping to deflect his poor handling of rising gas prices.

But while Romney and Obama begin to engage, the republicans have yet to settle on a nominee. Romney is the clear front-runner and it is certainly his nomination to lose, but Rick Santorum, Newt Gingrich and Ron Paul have yet to concede anything. In fact Tuesday brings with it, another round of primaries. They are contests that could result in gains for Romney, but may not be enough for the former Massachusetts governor to close the deal.

Here in Virginia though, the general election is already underway in earnest. And we are still more than 200 days away from voters going to the polls.

**The ad from the American Energy Alliance can be seen below:

 

 

Written by Ryan Nobles

April 2, 2012 at 10:28 pm

Virginia primary: by the numbers

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By: Ryan Nobles – bio | email

It was largely an uneventful night in the Commonwealth of Virginia, but we did learn a little bit about the electorate and where it may lead us in November. For the most part the news was mostly good for former Massachussettes Gov. Mitt Romney.

Here is a look at some of the more interesting numbers that came out of Tuesday nights vote:

VA Primary Results:

Delegate breakdown:
*Total up grabs- 46
*Romney- 43
*Paul- 3

Exit Polls
(If all had made the ballot)

Romney- 40%
Paul- 24%
Santorum- 20%
Gingrich- 13%

Geographic Results
Romney vote totals

Richmond area- 59%
Hampton Roads- 58%
D.C. Suburbs- 59%
Northern VA- 52%

Total Turnout
263,186 of 5,155,342 total voters (5.105%)

Now on to the general election for Virginia voters.. no rest for the political talk as President Barack Obama comes to Prince George on Friday.

Written by Ryan Nobles

March 6, 2012 at 10:29 pm

Cuccinelli, gay marriage and the 10th Amendment

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By: Ryan Nobles – bio | email

It is a thorny issue that has gotten at least two presidential candidates in trouble with important aspects of their base. In a battle to secure two vital and reliable voting blocks, the tough choices regarding gay marriage can lead to confusing stances.

One influential part of the republican party,  social conservatives, are opposed to gay marriage under any circumstances. Many support a constitutional amendment that would confine marriage to one man and one woman. They believe that it is not only the federal government’s right, but its responsibility to get involved in the marriage debate.

Another, growing voting block comes from the emerging tea party. A group advocating for as little government as possible. In particular they want as much power in the hands of state governments as enumerated in the 10th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.  Constitutional purists would argue that if a state (like New York, Iowa and others already have) would like to legalize gay marriage, than the Federal Government should butt out.

This difficult balance led to a confusing explanation on her gay marriage stance from Rep. Michelle Bachmann (R-MN) a candidate for president and a darling of both the tea party and social conservatives.  Bachmann first said that New York’s law should stand, based on the 10th Amendment, but then later said she supported a constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage.

Gov. Rick Perry (R-TX) who is expected to announce his intentions this weekend, ran into a similar conundrum. In fact, just today, Perry’s 10th Amendment priority was attacked by former Sen. Rick Santorum (R-PA), a strong social conservative.

Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli shares a similar political identity. He told me in an interview last week that he is committed to what he called “first principles”. Principles shaped  by the founding fathers, principles like the 10th Amendment and state’s rights.  He is also very much opposed gay marriage and is open to the idea of a constitutional amendment to ban the practice.

However, in the current climate, the Attorney General made it clear that state’s rights take precedent.

“The Supreme Court ruled that marriage is not a subject that the federal government can exercise jurisdiction over,” he said. “Including the courts.”

Cuccinelli made it clear, that he was more concerned about the federal government (especially the current administration) forcing states to allow gay marriage or recognizing unions from other states.  In his mind that is the greater threat. He conceded however, that barring a constitutional amendment, there is little the federal government can or should do when an individual state allows marriage between same-sex couples.

“Frankly, I think it is worth some consideration for the things that aren’t reached by the federal constitution to just leave it to each state,” said Cuccinelli. “That is the way abortion was before Roe v. Wade.”

When judging the balance between state’s rights and social conservative values, Cuccinelli believes the federal government’s reach is the greater threat.

“As between the two options, I certainly prefer the states deciding these constitutional questions and I don’t mean just the one you raised,” he said. “I mean all the ones that fall in that gray area of whether or not the federal government can do it.”

He went on to say, “If it is a gray area, the federal government shouldn’t be able to do it.”

But despite the continued progress same-sex marriage laws have made in states across the country, Cuccinelli is confident that when left of up to the people of each state, most will choose to protect traditional marriage.

“Where this has gone to the people the people are 31-0, in all states, including California and Maine not places that are thought of as conservative bastions, where traditional marriage has been protected by the people.”

For Cuccinelli the battleground is state by state and it is something he believes traditional marriage supporters can still win.

“You saw it pass New York recently,” he said. “Put in on the ballot in New York and see what happens.”

The Attorney General’s complete remarks on same-sex marriage and the 10th Amendment can be found below:

Written by Ryan Nobles

August 10, 2011 at 11:12 am